Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Global markets for bioplastics to grow at 41.4% CAGR from 2010 through 2015

Bioplastics will grow at a significant pace over the next 5 years. The total worldwide use of bioplastics is valued at 571,712 metric tons in 2010. This usage is expected to grow at a 41.4% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) from 2010 through 2015, to reach 3,230,660 metric tons in 2015.

Learn about the trends that will affect use of bioplastics and their major end-use application markets. Get information on the specific end markets for bioplastics by material type and forecasts for market developments from the viewpoint of major applications for bioplastics, that is, packaging, automotive, electrical/electronic, medical, building, and construction and others...

Use this report to:
  • Learn how market forces, especially an increasing focus on environmental threats such as global warming and disposal of products containing toxic materials, have strongly driven development and early use of bioplastics
  • Identify trends that will affect use of bioplastics and their major end-use application markets, including limits on use of plastics packaging and potential limits on use of vinyl compounds in medical applications 
  • Develop marketing strategies based on analysis and forecast of market developments in major applications for bioplastics, such as packaging, automotive, electrical/electronic, medical, building, and construction and others
  • Gain competitive intelligence on many of the most important suppliers of bioplastics, including resin producers and compounders.
To provide further information about this report we offer a Complimentary Introduction, available from our Website. To download, simply click here, go to the Table of Contents tab, add the complimentary introduction to your cart, and confirm your order.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Great topic here.
Work of many people on this issue of plastic, there are several plastic materials recycling organic-based view. In February, for example, Imperial College London and bioceramic drug polymer biodegradable plastic from sugar derived from the decay of lignocellulosic biomass. There is also an existing plant more corn starch and plastics based on paper, including household goods and food packaging, bioplastics toys, plastic dynamic Cereplast. Metabolix also several lines of plastic products from corn, in cooperation with partner companies.

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